TRAFFIC MATTERS…. GOOD HOUSE FLOW IS A MUST!

22106   Non-Addition

People should have some sort of transition when entering their homes.  An exterior door that opens abruptly into a living space, with no accommodation for incoming “stuff” that we carry in and out, is simply – inadequate. And in areas where there is snow and cold weather, the incoming door should have places for coats, boots and shoes.

PROBLEM

This brick bungalow in the Midwest had very an extremely small front vestibule (A) that offered no space to greet visitors or even to move bodies to access the tiny coat closet. The fact that the front door is vestibuled is good because it potentially can keep out some cold air when the door is opened.

The exterior door most used is the one on the side (B), just off the driveway. This also is less than ideal for many reasons: 1.) people have a view of the basement stairs (C) which is not usually attractive 2.) one must negotiate steps immediately upon entering the house 3.) all traffic passes through the kitchen, which can disrupt activities in the kitchen 4.) incoming “stuff” usually gets dumped on the kitchen counters and the floor, creating more chaos 5.) the kitchen (D) is small and is usually reduced to being just a hallway.

The dining room (E) is also a pass-through room but is usually dormant and not used so passing through is not a big issue.

The living room (F) is large and is the room most used in the house.

There is a sunroom (G) right off the dining room. This should be an asset because it has windows all around with great views of their expansive backyard but somehow it became the “junk room”, a place for furniture and stuff not used.  You could live in this house and not even recognize there is a room there.

The remainder of the house is two small bedrooms (H & I) and a full bath (J).  the finished half story (K) has one large room.

SOLUTION

I determined that the kitchen (D) needed to be moved and that space should be used as a family entry (L).  I saw the side door (B) as a liability, but it stayed put to access the basement in one straight shot.  A door was added (M) to close off the view of the basement stair. A new exterior door (N) is now the main backdoor that people use when coming in from the garage (O) or the driveway. This new family entry has everything…a “to go” counter and cabinet for items coming or going, a bench, a shoe tower, a coat closet and even a pantry (P) for the new kitchen (Q). We built a small deck (R) that ties to the backdoor (N) and has French doors from the kitchen for direct from the garage or for serving food outdoors.

The kitchen (Q) is a simple L shape with expansive counters.  The corner sink gives views in two directions of the backyard.  The island is perfect as a prep space, eat-on feature, and even as a staging spot for grilling out or buffet surface.  The kitchen brings lots of light into the house, however, occasionally it would be nice to close it off because of cooking smells/noises or private conversations. We added white glass barn type doors for that purpose.

The dining room (E) got larger by eliminating the china cabinet.  Some people like them but they are no longer a ‘must’ to display fine china and crystal.

MARCIA LYON is a professional remodeling designer and freelance writer, producing projects locally and several other areas across the US and Canada. Like Creating Spaces on Facebook! Reach Marcia at archimeatus@gmail.com; or phone 515-991-1300.   Her website is http://www.creatingspacesdesign.com

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ADDITION NOT NECESSARY – JUST MOVE THE KITCHEN

22105   Addition

Why, when a family is cramped for space, the idea of adding square footage is all they can think of? Additions aren’t always the answer.  The typical new room generally hangs off the back of the house, often carving a traffic path right through existing rooms. Even more troublesome, additions may eclipse already dark rooms by adding more distance to daylight. I am not opposed to additions by any means.  They must be thoughtfully laid out – quantity of square footage doesn’t always present the best solution.

PROBLEM

The owners focused on their cramped kitchen (A) complaining (as usual) of not enough storage space.  The eat-in kitchen was also the only access (B) to the backyard. They thought if they could just build an addition (C) to push the kitchen out further, it could solve all of their kitchen problems.  Little thought was given to what the former kitchen (A) space would become.

Lacking outdoor entertaining and cook-out space, they wanted to establish an outdoor space – out past the kitchen addition (C).

The living room (D) wan a nice size and proportion, but traffic, with groceries, went from the garage (E) went through a sliding glass door in the dining room (F) and across part of the living room (D) to get to the kitchen (A).

There was no family entry so, coats, books and other items were dropped along the path to the kitchen.  It seemed to me that the dining room (F) was in what was an old porch. If that is the case, continuing to use it would require checking the footings and the structural elements to ensure that it is sound.  Likely there are no heat ducts for the dining room.

The homeowners thought that when the contractor was there building the kitchen addition, it would be smart to square off the building by including an addition (G) to the garage (E).

SOLUTION

My natural conservative approach to spending my client’s money made me really question if two additions were really needed. `The traffic from the garage really bothered me, so I gave the garage addition (G) more thought. What was needed was transition space, so I created a family entry (H) and a laundry room (I).  Next, I created a new kitchen (J) in what was the dining room, and opened it up to the living room (D). I have often written about not exposing the entire kitchen to the living room so that you are not sitting on the couch looking at the refrigerator, so appliance placement was important.  I added two skylights (K) to lighten both the kitchen and the living room.  I made sure that there was a new glass door (L) out to the new deck (M).

The former kitchen space (A) was repurposed into a great dining room with French doors (O) out to the deck (M).

The front hall coat closet (P) was converted into a closet for cleaning supplies, and a new, larger coat closet (Q) finished off the entry space.

MARCIA LYON is a professional remodeling designer and freelance writer, producing projects locally and several other areas across the US and Canada. Like Creating Spaces on Facebook! Reach Marcia at archimeatus@gmail.com; or phone 515-991-1300.   Her website is http://www.creatingspacesdesign.com

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UNSTIFFEL A CLOSED-OFF HOUSE

22104 Addition

CREATING SPACES tm           by Marcia Lyon

We used to live in houses that were much more compartmentalized than what we desire currently. Not every can or should be blown wide open. I don’t think that it is particularly nice to see the kitchen when people come in the front door; that is unless the house is a one room cabin!

PROBLEM

This colonial house had a few problems beyond having closed-off spaces.  For one, the only outdoor entertaining space is a deck (A) off the solarium (B), remote from the kitchen (C). It is a nice space to visit with people in the pool (D) but not convenient to bringing food and drink outside. The exterior door (E) most near the kitchen is on the basement stairway landing (F), right next to one of the world’s smallest half bathrooms (G) which is unfortunately also used for people to change into their bathing suits – ouch!

The solarium (B) is a lovely room but too narrow for good furniture arrangements.

The kitchen (C) is somewhat fragmented with the refrigerator across the room. This kitchen does have a nice alcove for a table for two.

Parking is either in the driveway (I) or beyond in the detached garage (not shown).

The homeowners wanted a more welcoming kitchen, better flow throughout and to have the house relate better to the in-ground pool (D).

SOLUTION

An addition was necessary, so I started with adding a porch (J) to the back of the house as an entry to the kitchen from the garage or driveway parking.  This porch continued to a larger deck (K) following the back wall of the house, offering plenty of places to grill out and serve food.

The back door (E) and landing (F) was changed to enter on the house floor level by adding stairs to the basement run (L) effectively creating a connection (M) from the living room to the kitchen (N).  The tiniest half bath (G) was removed and a larger one (O) added, large enough to serve as a changing room while still maintaining a close proximity to the swimming pool (D).

Just inside of the new back porch (J) is a family entry (P) with coat closet, hooks, and a bench. Steps inside is a large expansive kitchen (N) with a skylight and larger casual dining space with views oriented towards the pool (D).

The solarium (B) width is expanded by adding an oversize bow bay window, creating another delightful place to spend time in this now attractive and highly functioning home.

MARCIA LYON is a professional remodeling designer and freelance writer, producing projects locally and several other areas across the US and Canada. Like Creating Spaces on Facebook! Reach Marcia at archimeatus@gmail.com; or phone 515-991-1300.   Her website is http://www.creatingspacesdesign.com

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UNSTIFFEL A CLOSED-OFF HOUSE

22104 Addition

CREATING SPACES tm           by Marcia Lyon

We used to live in houses that were much more compartmentalized than what we desire currently. Not every can or should be blown wide open. I don’t think that it is particularly nice to see the kitchen when people come in the front door; that is unless the house is a one room cabin!

PROBLEM

This colonial house had a few problems beyond having closed-off spaces.  For one, the only outdoor entertaining space is a deck (A) off the solarium (B), remote from the kitchen (C). It is a nice space to visit with people in the pool (D) but not convenient to bringing food and drink outside. The exterior door (E) most near the kitchen is on the basement stairway landing (F), right next to one of the world’s smallest half bathrooms (G) which is unfortunately also used for people to change into their bathing suits – ouch!

The solarium (B) is a lovely room but too narrow for good furniture arrangements.

The kitchen (C) is somewhat fragmented with the refrigerator across the room. This kitchen does have a nice alcove for a table for two.

Parking is either in the driveway (I) or beyond in the detached garage (not shown).

The homeowners wanted a more welcoming kitchen, better flow throughout and to have the house relate better to the in-ground pool (D).

SOLUTION

An addition was necessary, so I started with adding a porch (J) to the back of the house as an entry to the kitchen from the garage or driveway parking.  This porch continued to a larger deck (K) following the back wall of the house, offering plenty of places to grill out and serve food.

The back door (E) and landing (F) was changed to enter on the house floor level by adding stairs to the basement run (L) effectively creating a connection (M) from the living room to the kitchen (N).  The tiniest half bath (G) was removed and a larger one (O) added, large enough to serve as a changing room while still maintaining a close proximity to the swimming pool (D).

Just inside of the new back porch (J) is a family entry (P) with coat closet, hooks, and a bench. Steps inside is a large expansive kitchen (N) with a skylight and larger casual dining space with views oriented towards the pool (D).

The solarium (B) width is expanded by adding an oversize bow bay window, creating another delightful place to spend time in this now attractive and highly functioning home.

MARCIA LYON is a professional remodeling designer and freelance writer, producing projects locally and several other areas across the US and Canada. Like Creating Spaces on Facebook! Reach Marcia at archimeatus@gmail.com; or phone 515-991-1300.   Her website is http://www.creatingspacesdesign.com

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WHAT HAPPENS WHEN THE STREET IN FRONT OF YOUR HOUSE IS REMOVED?

22103   Non-Addition Backwards House

Houses are designed to orient towards the street outside. An entrance brings people into the more ‘formal’ part of the house and the more private areas are beyond. But what happens when the city, township or town makes changes to the surrounding areas and suddenly your street is abandoned, replaced by a large earth fall off and down to a new highway?  Happily, a new street was added, but it was behind the house!  These changes also consumed the backyard. The plan needs to be completely re-thought.

PROBLEM

This colonial home was built in 1903. The original house (A) and must have had a small addition on the back for the kitchen and a back porch.

Years later, after the street was stolen, someone built an addition (B) was built and a new entrance (C) was established on the side. This provided ample room for a large, open kitchen (D) and dining area (E).

And finally, the last addition (F) was added for a family room (G). This was on the new front of the house.

The entire house was two stories and the homeowners added a second stair (H) because the primary stairway (I) was far away and enclosed with doors.

The furnace flue (J) was stuck in the middle and was eventually removed when a PVC ducted furnace was installed.

Parking (K) was along the side of the house with no garage.

This house had some serious plan issues that made living in it awkward.

SOLUTION

One particularly important change was to rebuild the front stairway (I) orienting the opposite way. The original front door was eliminated, and we added a closet (L) in what was the small foyer.  We were able to open the living room (M) and with some changes in windows, the den became a sunroom (N), with small French doors at the entrance.   This new sunroom takes advantage of the south side.

A coffee bar (O) was added next to the half bath.

French doors (P) are added to access the new and spacious deck (Q) that replaced the concrete slab that was used for entertaining. This helps to visually widen the house at the center.

The dining (E) is flex space as it was before.  On occasions where many people will be dining, the table has lots of room to grow.

A walk-in pantry (R) is great to store countertop appliances, food, etc. The kitchen (D) is re-worked (S) to include a large peninsula (T) with stools on the family room side.  This effectively opens up and connects the kitchen (S) to the family room (G). This was made possible when we re-routed the stairway (H) to go along the side wall and not separate the family room addition (F).

MARCIA LYON is a professional remodeling designer and freelance writer, producing projects locally and several other areas across the US and Canada. Like Creating Spaces on Facebook! Reach Marcia at archimeatus@gmail.com; or phone 515-991-1300.   Her website is http://www.creatingspacesdesign.com

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EVALUATE AND RE-IMAGINE ALL SPACES FOR ULTIMATE EFFICENCY WITHOUT AN ADDITION

  by Marcia Lyon

22102   Non-Addition

CREATING SPACES tm         

          

When spaces are not ‘defined’ for a specific use, they become collecting spots for miscellaneous things that have no home. Each area of your home should be defined, providing logical use of each function.

PROBLEM

This home is on a corner lot in a historic area of town. The lots are close together and the property lines dictate to a large degree, what can be done with the house. Corner lots effectively have two “front setbacks” as far as the city is concerned, further restricting buildable land.

The homeowners already chose to re-direct traffic to the driveway side, where family and friends park. They made the decision to convert the former front porch (not sown) to useable space in the home. This was the only way they could expand their house.

The entrance (A) was always used, so they improved it to treat it as the main entrance of the home.

Guests could go straight into the living room (B) and dining room (C).

The kitchen (D) is somewhat obscured from the more formal spaces. The end of the kitchen (E) is something like a ‘no man’s land’ and collected ‘stuff’ over time. There was not a door to access the diminutive backyard (F).  The occasional time the family used a grill, it was outside on the driveway (G).

The homeowners wanted to update the kitchen and just generally reevaluate their space. They didn’t like the idea of formal and informal space because they wanted to (and needed to) live in every part of their house.

SOLUTION

Their side entry (A) needed a small gable roof (H) to provide some cover for the door entering right off the driveway.  This addition is both visually appealing and practical.

The living room (B) was large but not laid out well for furniture. With the addition of a wall (I) the living room furniture was more contained, and the French pocket doors allow the sharing of natural light and can contain some sound.  The large windows in the living room offer nice views of greenery on their non-buildable land.  Nicely landscaped, the views are stupendous.

Although the living (B) and dining (C) rooms are combined under a lovely, beamed ceiling, I felt that too much space was dedicated to the dining table, which was rarely used.  I added another large window and centered a round table under one of the beams, tucking it closer to the exterior wall.

Grilling outside was done on the driveway (G) without a graceful path from the kitchen.  I chose to add a back door (J) and small entry deck (K), providing a close spot for grilling and a more direct way to get into the kitchen (D). Creating this new entry, a bench and coat hooks were added.  Also in this space is a closet style pantry which helped this kitchen with few wall cabinets.

The table in the kitchen (M) was more of an obstacle than a help since the tabletop was 30” high and had four chairs around it. When the appliances were rearranged, it made more sense to make an island as more prep space, storage, and eat in feature. Hopefully with the dining area (C) improvements, more meals will take place there.

A refrigerator and range are not really great neighbors. Both take up space and a range requires elbow space with counter on both sides.  The refrigerator moved to the end by the new pantry (L), and we sacrificed one window to do this.  Also, there is a relationship between the refrigerator and the microwave because almost everything you put into a microwave comes from either the refrigerator, freezer, or sink. This appliance should be a raised to be at the cook’s eye level, with counter space below.

MARCIA LYON is a professional remodeling designer and freelance writer, producing projects locally and several other areas across the US and Canada. Like Creating Spaces on Facebook! Reach Marcia at archimeatus@gmail.com; or phone 515-991-1300.   Her website is http://www.creatingspacesdesign.com

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ILLCONCIEVED STAIRWAYS AND ENTRIES KEEP THIS HOME FROM FLOWING

22101   Non Addition

CREATING SPACES tm           by Marcia Lyon

Stairways that look (and feel) like afterthoughts degrade the value of the home. They certainly don’t have to be a prominent feature but if your only way upstairs to the bedrooms is through a weird closet in the kitchen, that can impact daily life.

Houses get changed through the years and those changes are not always well thought out. Usually, people make a reactive change to their homes to solve an immanent problem, sometimes creating uncomfortable proportions and peculiar roof lines.

Back up, take a breath and work the plan for good traffic patterns, views, and proportions.

PROBLEM

This story and a half home was probably built in the 30’s.  I suspect there had been a porch (A) for the front door (B) instead of a concrete stoop.  Guests enter the home in an oversized living room (C). There is a fireplace (D) that is not in an ideal location, but I’d rather save money and keep it where it is and make it work.

A very large dining room (E) is next, with a den (F) off it.  The next room is the kitchen (G), which is isolated from the living space.  A half bath (H) opens off the kitchen, which most people would find objectional. Another door in the kitchen exposes a fairly tight and dark stairway (I) up to the two bedrooms and full bath (not shown) upstairs.

A former porch (J) off the dining room (E) must have been nice or at least functional at one time, but now, it is where the stair to the basement (K) was put.  An awkward double stair with a landing is how the side yard is accessed (L). This is essentially the back door – but to nothing because no outdoor living space was developed.

The laundry is in the basement, so this stair is used at least once a week.  Since the porch was so chopped up, it wasn’t good for anything except accumulated junk.  It was full.

This whole house made me feel uncomfortable and the homeowners felt the same. They had lived in the home for 8 months and knew that they wanted some big changes!

SOLUTION

With no garage or desire for one, they were happy with parking in the circle drive. The front door (B) needed a porch (A) to identify the entrance. I claimed this end of the living room (C) for an entry (M), coat closet (N), and stairs up (O) and down (P).  We made a dramatic statement by removing the ceiling in the living room (C), resulting in a cathedral ceiling.

The kitchen (G) was relocated into the dining room (E), making the island a main gathering spot for the house. I recessed two closet style pantries (R) into the existing den (F).  The den door (S) was put in the living room (C).  A built-in desk made this more abbreviated space work efficiently.

The porch was rebuilt and made to be heated and cooled with the house.  The new dining room (J) is more convenient and has a view.

The tiny half bath (H) was enlarged, and a window added.  Now, it is off a hall and not the kitchen. The former stair up (I) and what remained of the kitchen made a great laundry room (T).  A new, short hall (U) is the way everyone can access the new deck (V), bringing people out to enjoy the newly landscaped side yard. This new back door (full glass) is not far from the kitchen and dining rooms.

MARCIA LYON is a professional remodeling designer and freelance writer, producing projects locally and several other areas across the US and Canada. Like Creating Spaces on Facebook! Reach Marcia at archimeatus@gmail.com; or phone 515-991-1300.   Her website is http://www.creatingspacesdesign.com

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DON’T PUT UP WITH AN ACKWARD KITCHEN! 

Most kitchens are built on an exterior wall so that there can be a window over the sink.  Through various remodelings, some of these kitchens turn into interior rooms with either no window or borrowed light which means that the space can see natural light from another place.  This is less than ideal.  Also, even though everyone now is making the kitchen the focal point of the house, it still needs to have direct access to the outdoors for cooking out and entertaining outdoors.

 

PROBLEM

This 1960’s ranch, with three bedrooms and hall bath (not shown) had a series of rooms along the back wall of the house and left the kitchen (A) ‘hanging’ between the living room (B) and a back door (C) on to a balcony.

The garage (D) with its tiny family entrance (E) brought family members across the dining room (F) [and the carpet] to get to the kitchen (A).

The front entry (G) was rarely used because it was far away from the pavement.

Across the back is a rather small family room (H) with a door outside and a dated and unused wet bar; a laundry room (J) that walks through to the ¾ bath (K).  The owners had no idea why there should be a small shower in this small bathroom.

The kitchen (A) is divided into small pieces that don’t provide efficiency in cooking. The back part of this kitchen had a small table in the corner and a door to the outside onto a balcony with no stairs down to the yard.

The homeowners wanted more backyard access and a better kitchen. They liked the idea of ‘open concept’ but didn’t know how to achieve it.  They wanted their family room to have more use and came up with the idea of a sun room for their many plants.

 

SOLUTION

I claimed more room for the family entry (E) by adding IN to the existing space.  This is an important function and it needs to relate to the kitchen.

We bumped out 6 feet for a conservative kitchen addition (L).  Three nice windows over the sink visually connect the kitchen (M) with the backyard.  A generous island is the spot for dropping off groceries and keeps visitors on the non-cooking side of the kitchen.

The family room (H) changed into a sun room by adding a tile floor, additional windows and a glass door out onto a new deck (N).  This deck steps down onto a brick terrace (O) and then back up again onto another deck (P) that is an extension of the balcony.  This offers great circulation between the house and outdoor entertaining.

The ¾ bath (K) was converted into a better ½ bath (Q) that backs up to a new laundry room (R).

The dining was shifted over to ‘tuck’ into a corner and visually enlarge the living room.

B&A 20902

MARCIA LYON is a professional remodeling designer and freelance writer, producing projects locally and several other areas across the US and Canada. Like Creating Spaces on Facebook! Reach Marcia at archimeatus@gmail.com; or phone 515-991-1300.   Her website is http://www.creatingspacesdesign.com

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FORMER DUPLEX BECOMES ONE COHESIVE HOUSE

B&A 20901

There are all kinds of duplexes – up and down; side by side; identical on both sides; different on each side.  Both units have their own front door and when they are combined to make one, which front door is used? Combing two into one makes for some big decision making. How do you deal with a single-family home with two kitchens? One of the biggest challenges is how to balance everything and make a flow plan that makes sense.

PROBLEM

This 1955 duplex had one two-bedroom unit (A) and the other unit had one bedroom (B).  The styling was quite nice and looked very much like a single-family home. Set on a corner lot (C), there was only street parking on the front and side. The family(s) parked (D) on the backside of the house and entering the basement, used the stairway (E) to access the units.

The current homeowners bought this split-personality home some 20 years ago and just lived with its combined quirks through the years of raising their children.  Heading toward retirement, they felt that it was time to give their home a big RE-THINK, so it could serve them into the future.

They lived primarily in the two-bedroom side (A) but using the bedroom (F) and the spacious living room (G).

Visitors were confused what front door to use [there were three!]. The front door (H) was the most visible, but the family was more often near the other one (I).  The third door (J) was on the side of the house facing their neighbors and wasn’t visible from either the street or parking behind.  Clearly entry identity was an issue.

The used the other two bedrooms (K&L) but only two (M&N) of the three bathrooms (O).

The kitchen (P) in the B unit had been used for many things but not a kitchen.  When the children were small, that seemed OK.  The kitchen (Q) in the A unit and the living room (R) were the two main rooms used.   They had developed a nice stone terrace (S) for entertaining, but when strangers used the (I) door, it felt wrong.

The homeowners requested a screened porch be added somewhere.

SOLUTION

The entry identity was the first job to be tackled. Door (H) seemed the easier one to get to from the street, so we added a porch (T). We created an entry (U) just inside by adding a coat closet and defining the space.

There was a need for an office (V) somewhat away from activity, so we created one here, consuming some of the living room (G) space.

The remainder of the second kitchen (P) worked well as a main floor laundry room (W).  We added some extra closets (X) in the hallway.

Bathroom (N) got re-configured to have a large more contemporary shower.

Bathroom (O) was turned into a large linen closet (Y).  Bathroom (M) stayed the same.

No changes in the side entry (J) or the bedrooms (F, L &K) or the living room (R).

The kitchen (Q) was updated, moving appliances and changing the peninsula into an island.

We added the screened porch (Z) just outside the kitchen, adding a glass door for access.  This porch was connected to the new front porch (T) with a bridge, making a good traffic connection. A door out from the screened porch, with steps down and a walkway connects to the stone terrace (S). Now the outdoor areas connect with the indoor areas with a good flow.

 

MARCIA LYON is a professional remodeling designer and freelance writer, producing projects locally and several other areas across the US and Canada. To reach Marcia email: archimeatus@gmail.com ; or phone 515–991–1300 Find her book on remodeling design The Essential Planner for Home Remodeling.

 

 

 

 

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THE NEED FOR A PROFESSIONAL ART SPACE CLEARLY REQUIRES ADDITION by Marcia Lyon

When you need to create a specific space, try to do it in such a way that the next homeowners can repurpose it.  We crave large spaces, but the new space should not ‘dwarf’ existing spaces and throw the floor plan out of proportion.  Existing spaces ideally will get modifications to improve flow throughout, resulting a balanced and pleasant over all house.

 

PROBLEM

This vintage home had some great, light filled rooms and decorative amenities. Starting with the spacious foyer (A) that has windows on two sides and a beautiful staircase.  The living room (B) is unusually large.  There are windows on every wall possible, detailed woodwork including a beamed ceiling and a fireplace (C) on an angle.  A traditional solarium (D) served as the art space for this artist until it became too small. Also, the homeowners wanted a visual separation from the living room.  The kitchen (E) had been remodeled in the early 80s’ and now seems confining.  It is open to the dining area (F) and enjoys the windows beyond.  This space is also confining since the bar stools back up to the dining chairs.  In the corner is a desk (G) which seems to work well.  The beautiful angled fireplace (C) is open on this side, but it no one really has a view of the fire from this side.  An expansive deck (H) is used often for grilling out and entertaining.

 

SOLUTION

In our planning session, we determined that it would be wise to add two stories and create an up to date master suite [not shown].  This will look well balanced on the exterior.

A 16-foot addition (I) was designed to provide lots of work space and storage of art pieces.  It has a glass door (J) to the new deck (K) for fresh air breaks; a counter with cabinets and a large sink; and shelves.  The art space (L) is not closed off with a door but takes advantage of the fireplace (C) by building a bench (M) opposite from the hearth as a transition space resulting in a pleasant little nook. The windows (N) in the back of the living room are fitted with stained glass panels, sharing light and art for both spaces.

We also extended the dining room (F) 4 feet (O), adding windows and a built-in cabinet for a coffee bar and dish display. There is a new door (P) for access from the kitchen (E) to the new deck (K).

We took this opportunity to reconfigure the kitchen (E) to enable more than one cook.  There is a narrow and long pantry (Q) next to the relocated door.  The new island is larger and reoriented so that not only can people back up the stools but can gather around it when it is used as a buffet counter.  All the appliances are within the L shaped work area.  We added a window above the relocated farm sink.

Looking at the floor plan as a whole, it looks as if it should have been designed like this originally and each space compliments the next.

 

MARCIA LYON is a professional remodeling designer and freelance writer, producing projects locally and several other areas across the US and Canada. Like Creating Spaces on Facebook! Reach Marcia at archimeatus@gmail.com; or phone 515-991-1300.   Her website is http://www.creatingspacesdesign.com

 

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